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«The Solidarity Encounter Between Indigenous Women and White Women in a Contemporary Canadian Context by Carol Lynne D’Arcangelis A thesis submitted ...»

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–  –  –

 My name is Carol Lynne D’Arcangelis and I am a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto in Adult Education and Community Development.

 I am studying the limits and possibilities of solidarity between Indigenous women and white women, around topics including (but not limited to) violence against Indigenous women, Indigenous land reclamations and environmental justice.

 I am interested in talking to you if you are 18 years of age or older; identify as either an Indigenous or white woman; and have done (or are doing) such alliance/solidarity work for at least six months or longer.

 My focus is on how colonial power relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in general play out in this “solidarity encounter.”  If you travel to meet me, I will reimburse you for your transportation costs.

If you are interested in participating, please contact me at:

cl.darcangelis@utoronto.ca I look forward to hearing from you...

Appendix B: Interview Guide for Indigenous Women/Feminists PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in looking at relations among women activists across race, age, class, gender, sexuality, physical or mental ability, etc. I am also interested in how colonialism shapes interactions in what I am calling the solidarity encounter. I would like to hear how think about these topics. As you will note, many questions overlap, but for clarity’s sake, I have underlined what I see as the main questions.

Interest in study and personal biography

1. Can you tell me about your background? (where and when you grow up; socioeconomic and educational background, etc.)

2. Why are you interested in the study?

Description of activism and (personal) motivations for solidarity

3. In broad terms, can you talk about the political activism that you’ve been involved in?

4. How has your political activism included solidarity with Indigenous women? What is involved in the work? (e.g., in a group, attending events) Were/are you in a group? If so, what was/is its main goals and composition (i.e., “mixed” with Indigenous/non-Indigenous members; women-only, etc.)?

Do you use the term solidarity? Why or why not?

In thinking about the experiences you’ve described, how would you define solidarity?

5. What has personally motivated you to do “solidarity work” with white women?

6. Have you noticed an increase of late in attempts at solidarity between Indigenous and nonIndigenous women? If so, around which issues?

For those working on violence against Indigenous women

7. What brought you to work on the issue of violence against Indigenous women?

What is your analysis of violence against Indigenous women? How is this analysis different from (or similar to) an analysis of violence against other women?

8. How would you describe any links between the GTA activist community working on violence against Indigenous women and similar communities/groups in other parts of Turtle Island?

Negotiating the “solidarity encounter” NOTE: I’m wondering how a person’s social location affects solidarity work. By social location, I am referring to race, ethnicity or nation; age; class; sexual orientation; physical or mental ability; being a survivor of violence; level of education; etc.

9. How do you locate yourself in this solidarity work?

Which aspects of your identity are most apparent in your solidarity work—in a positive or negative way?

10. Can you talk about your experiences working in solidarity with white women? Can you describe in detail a moment or situation that stands out for you?

What feelings come up for you?

How has it been empowering or disempowering; positive or negative?

What are some of the challenges obstacles you’ve encountered—personally or otherwise?

What has worked and what hasn’t? What has made it harder or easier?

11. Can you describe an example where you noticed the power dynamics between Indigenous and white women, among white women or among Indigenous women?

Would you describe any of these power dynamics as colonial—“little bursts” of the “colonial story repeating itself” (white woman activist in Reinsborough & Barndt, 2010, p.

175)?

How do you define colonialism? Do you use the term in your activist work?

12. Have you found that many white women experience “white guilt”? How does this shape the solidarity encounter in your view?

13. What, if any, major differences in terms of positions have emerged between Indigenous women and white women on [... fill in with your issue]? Is it harder to work in solidarity with white women around some issues more than others?

E.g., prostitution/sex work; abortion; violence against Indigenous women; reclaiming Indigenous traditions/religions (re-traditionalization); immigration/migration; role of men in Indigenous women’s struggles; land reclamations

14. How do your experiences with white women compare or contrast with your experiences working in solidarity with racialized women/women of colour?

Towards non-colonizing solidarity: lessons learned/strategies to meet challenges

15. What have you learned about the role white women can play as allies in Indigenous women’s struggles?

What about when white women are faced with political or personal differences between Indigenous women?

Can you talk about one thing you would do differently?

16. Is No More Silence (NMS) relatively unique in its composition? If so, why are there so few groups like NMS? If NMS remains mostly white, what should it’s role be in terms of the Feb 14 vigil?

17. What is the role of Indigenous women as allies in the struggles of other women?

18. What steps have you personally (or your group) taken to meet the challenges of fostering solidarity with white women?

Does decolonization play a role in these efforts? What does decolonization mean to you?

19. How have your experiences working with white women changed over time?

Are you still involved in solidarity efforts? What keeps you involved, or what made you stop?

20. What would make non-colonizing solidarity possible?

Would it be helpful for white women to acknowledge their status as settlers, and also their complicity in the colonial past and present? What is involved in this acknowledgement?

What is a settler in your definition?

21. Can/should solidarity work be done in a way that promotes healing? If so, how?

(Indigenous) Feminism

22. What does feminism mean to you?

Do you have a different understanding or appreciation of feminism because of your participation in this work? (E.g., are you more critical?)

23. Have feminist ideas helped or hindered the practice of solidarity in your experience?

More specifically, are you familiar with Indigenous feminisms? How have they influenced how you think about and practice solidarity?

Transformations, personal and collective

24. How has solidarity work transformed you? How has it transformed others? How has it transformed your group?

Describe any transformative moments you’ve had through working with Indigenous women?

25. Do you think solidarity work always transforms people, personally and/or collectively?

► Is there anything else you’d like to add about what you have learned by working in solidarity with white women? Do you have any questions for me?

Appendix C: Interview Guide for White Women/Feminists PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in looking at relations among women activists across race, age, class, gender, sexuality, physical or mental ability, etc. I am also interested in how colonialism shapes interactions in what I am calling the solidarity encounter. I would like to hear how think about these topics. As you will note, many questions overlap, but for clarity’s sake, I have underlined what I see as the main questions.

Interest in study and personal biography

26. Why are you interested in the study?

27. Can you tell me something about your background? (your identity; where and when you grow up; your socioeconomic and educational background, etc.) Description of activism and (personal) motivations for solidarity

28. Can you talk about the political activism—as you define it—that you’ve been involved in?

For example, describe the main goals and composition (i.e., “mixed” with Indigenous/nonIndigenous members; women-only, etc.) of any group(s) you’ve been involved in.

Do you consider yourself part of an activist community?

29. What is solidarity for you? According to this definition, how have you come to solidarity work with Indigenous women? What is involved in the work? (e.g., in a group, attending events) Do you use the term solidarity? Why or why not?

30. What has personally motivated you to do “solidarity work” with Indigenous women?

31. Have you noticed an increase of late in attempts at solidarity between Indigenous and nonIndigenous women? If so, around which issues?

For those working on violence against Indigenous women

32. What brought you to work on the issue of violence against Indigenous women?

What is your analysis of violence against Indigenous women? How is this analysis different from (or similar to) an analysis of violence against other women?

33. How would you describe any links between the GTA activist community working on violence against Indigenous women and similar communities/groups in other parts of Turtle Island?

Examining the “solidarity encounter”

34. What has it been like for you to work “in solidarity” with Indigenous women (empowering or disempowering aspects)? What feelings come up for you?

NOTE: I’m wondering how a person’s social location affects the way that they engage in solidarity work. By social location, I am referring to one’s nation, race or ethnicity; age; class;

sexual orientation; being a survivor of violence; level of education; etc.

35. How do you situate yourself in relation to Canada’s colonial past and present? Do you use the term settler? Why or why not? What responsibilities come with being a non-Indigenous woman in relation to Canada’s colonial past and present?

36. How does being a non-Indigenous, white woman affect the way you interact with Indigenous women in a solidarity setting?

For example, in these interactions, are you always conscious of being white?

Which other aspects of your identity seem to matter in your solidarity work with Indigenous women—whether in a negative or positive way?

37. What challenges or obstacles have you encountered—personally or otherwise?

Can you describe in detail a tense moment or situation that stands out for you?

Can you talk about anything you would do differently?

38. Can you talk about any power dynamics you’ve noticed—not only between white women and Indigenous women, but also among white women or among Indigenous women?

Would you describe any of these power dynamics as colonial—“little bursts” of the “colonial story repeating itself” (white woman activist in Reinsborough & Barndt, 2010, p.

175)?

How would you define colonialism? Do you use the term in your activist work?

39. Have you experienced “white guilt”? If so, what affect has this had on your solidarity efforts?

40. Is it harder to work in solidarity with Indigenous women around some issues more than others?

E.g., prostitution/sex work; abortion; violence against Indigenous women; reclaiming Indigenous traditions/religions (re-traditionalization); immigration/migration; role of men in Indigenous women’s struggles; land reclamations Towards non-colonizing solidarity: strategies to work through tensions/meet challenges

41. How do you define ally, and what role should white women allies play in Indigenous women’s struggles?

What about when you are faced with political or personal differences among Indigenous women?

42. Is No More Silence (NMS) relatively unique in its composition? If so, why are there so few groups like NMS?

If NMS remains mostly white, what should its role be in terms of the Feb 14 vigil?

43. Is there a role for Indigenous women as allies in the struggles of other women?

44. What steps have you personally (or your group) taken to be a better ally with Indigenous women?

Have you tried to decolonize in the process? What has this meant to you?

How important has it been to educate yourself about Canada’s colonial past and present?

45. How have your experiences working with Indigenous women changed over time?

Are you still involved in solidarity efforts? What keeps you involved, or what made you stop?

46. Is non-colonizing solidarity possible? What would make it possible?

47. Can/should solidarity work be done in a way that promotes healing? If so, how?

(Indigenous) Feminism and other theories

48. What does feminism mean to you?

49. Do you have a different understanding or appreciation of feminism because of your participation in this work? (E.g., are you more critical?) Have feminist ideas helped or hindered the practice of solidarity in your experience?

More specifically, are you familiar with Indigenous feminisms? How have they influenced your engagement in solidarity work?

Transformations, personal and collective

50. How has working with Indigenous women personally transformed you? How has it collectively transformed your group?

More specifically, how has your view of Canada and/or being Canadian been altered by this work, if at all?

51. Do you think solidarity work always transforms people, personally and/or collectively?

52. What else have you learned by working with Indigenous women?

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«Pablo Valdivia y Alvarado Engineering Product Development, Singapore University of Technology and Design 8 Somapah Road, # 02-101, Building 1, Level 2, Singapore 487372, PH: (65)-6499-8883 Email: pablov@sutd.edu.sg Web: www.dedoux.com RESEARCH INTERESTS: Soft Robots and Sensors, Bio-inspired Design, Modeling and Control of Unsteady Locomotion in Fluids, Environmental Studies.EDUCATION Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering, 2007....»

«FORGIVENESS, PERFECTIONISM, AND THE ROLE OF SELF-COMPASSION By BROOKE A. MISTLER A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA © 2010 Brooke A. Mistler To the balance of process and outcome ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I am grateful to everyone who helped me to complete this project, as well as offered me support and guidance during graduate school. Thanks go out to my...»

«The Perfect Approach to Adverbs Applying variation theory to competing models Joseph Roy Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Doctorate in Philosophy degree in Linguistics Department of Linguistics Faculty of Arts University of Ottawa c Joseph Roy, Ottawa, Canada, 2014 Abstract The question of adverbs and the meaning of the present perfect across varieties of English is central to sociolinguistic variationist...»





 
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